Children

If your child has a claim to U.S. citizenship, s/he is required to enter and depart the United States on a valid U.S. passport. S/he should not enter the United States on a foreign passport with a visa, or visa free under the Visa Waiver Program.

If you are eligible to transmit citizenship, you may register your child’s birth at the Embassy and obtain a passport and social security number for him or her. Read more…

A Consular Report of Birth Abroad, Form FS-240, is official evidence of U.S. citizenship issued to a person under the age of 18 who was born abroad to U.S. citizen parent(s) and acquired citizenship at birth.

The birth should be reported to us as soon as possible after the baby is born and before his or her first trip to the United States.  Persons over the age of 18 are not eligible for a Consular Report of Birth Abroad.

U.S. citizenship is for life. No child has to do anything at any age to retain, choose, affirm, or confirm American citizenship.

No.  All children, including babies, must have their own passport.

Yes. All children under the age of 18 are required to appear in person for all passport services. Children under the age of 16 must be accompanied by both parents. An appointment will be required; please see the instructions for your specific passport service for more information.

Yes, the consent of both parents/legal guardians is required, even if one parent is not a U.S. citizen. Read more…

The other parent may submit his/her consent by completing form DS-3053 before a notary and submitting acceptable ID.

Each case is different and will be assessed by one of our consular officers. We recommend that you provide as much documentation as possible showing that you have made a “good faith effort” to contact your child’s parent through all available channels (family members, mutual friends, last known employer, divorce lawyer/solicitor, etc). It may be necessary for you to obtain a court order giving you sole custody or permission to apply for a U.S. passport for the child without the other parent’s consent.

Children aged 14 and over may sign their own passports. For children under the age of 14, a parent should sign. In the space provided for the signature, the mother or father must print the child’s name and sign his/her own name. Then, in parentheses, by the parent’s name, write the word (mother) or (father) so we know who signed for the child.

Because of increasing instances of child abduction in custody cases, and a growing number of children who are the victims of trafficking or pornography, an immigration officer, airline, or travel company may ask you to provide some form of letter of consent if your child is traveling internationally with only one parent or with another adult, such as a grandparent, aunt, uncle, etc.

The Children’s Passport Issuance Alert Program (CPIAP) allows the Department of State’s Office of Children’s Issues to contact the enrolling parent(s) or legal guardians(s) to verify whether the parental consent requirement for minor passport issuance has been met when a passport application has been submitted for an enrolled child. In addition, upon a child’s enrollment in the CPIAP, we may alert the enrolling parent(s) or legal guardian(s) of a pending passport application and past passport issuances for the child. Only U.S. citizens or children who qualify for U.S. citizenship under the age of 18 can be enrolled in the CPIAP.  Read more…